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WOODCLIFF LAKE, NJ -- (Marketwire) -- 10/30/09 -- SYS-CON Events announced today that the 5th International Cloud Computing Conference & Expo  will take place April 19-20-21, 2010, at the Jacob Javits Convention Center in New York City. The International Cloud Computing Conference & Expo series is the world's leading Cloud-focused event and is held three times a year, in New York, Silicon Valley and in Europe. Over 200 corporate sponsors and 10,000 industry professionals have participated in Cloud Computing Expo since its inception, more than all other Cloud-related events put together. The three-day event will offer a rich array of sessions led by exceptional speakers about the business and technical value of cloud computing with more than 80 sponsors and exhibitors on the 70,000 sq. ft. show floor and over 5,000 estimated delegates from well over 48 different cou... (more)

Cloud Expo 2011 New York Expands Technical Program

Due to a record increase in the number, quality and breadth of submissions to the Conference Advisory Board, the organizers of 8th Cloud Expo (June 6-9, 2011) - Cloud Expo New York 2011 - have extended the technical program through the addition of an all-new "Telcos in the Cloud" track - to complement the already extensive selection of tracks, including "Enterprise-Level Cloud Computing," "Federal/Government Cloud Computing," "Real-World Virtualization,"Cloud Security & Performance," "The Cloud in Practice: Case Studies," and the always-popular "Hot Topics" track. Because the sheer quantity and quality of submitted sessions has outstripped the ability to assess each one fully and fairly - there have been a staggering 1,300 submissions thus far, for just 150 or so slots - the deadline for submitting speaking proposals to the conference is also being extended too, unt... (more)

RightScale Delivers Full Support for Amazon’s Elastic Block Store In the Cloud

RightScale announced full support for Amazon Web Services’ (AWS) Elastic Block Store (EBS) cloud storage solution, providing immediate benefits of a virtually limitless storage area network for all RightScale users, directly from the RightScale Dashboard. RightScale customers, including users of its free developer edition, can utilize EBS with RightScale to manage and allocate one or more disk volumes from 1GB to 1TB each, maintain data availability even when virtual servers are shut down, and create backups via the snapshot feature. Snapshotting stores the EBS volume to Amazon’s Simple Storage Service (S3), with redundancy built in. Previously, when an instance was shut down, all data was lost. Now users can take a snapshot of an EBS volume at any time, store it, and use it later to create a new volume. Combined with the RightScale platform, EBS opens up a much mo... (more)

GigaSpaces and RightScale Partner to Deliver Scalable Applications in the Amazon EC2 Cloud

GigaSpaces Technologies and RightScale announced their alliance to provide an integrated solution for the Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2). Ideal for data-intensive and transactional applications, the joint solution offers an affordable end-to-end stack for easily deploying and scaling applications running on Amazon Web Services. By integrating the GigaSpaces eXtreme Application Platform (XAP) with RightScale’s automated cloud computing management platform, customers will have unparalleled automation, simplicity and performance in scaling-out applications in the cloud.  The need for scalable, reliable solutions that deliver superior results has never been greater. Businesses across industries are demanding high performance applications that can keep up with company growth and expanding data volumes. Yet, traditional IT approaches cannot meet this need in an effici... (more)

Talking to Simon Wardley About Ubuntu and Cloud Computing

Image via Wikipedia Most readers of this blog are probably well aware that a new version of the Ubuntu Linux distribution is coming this week, and that it will be putting code from the Open Source EUCALYPTUS Project to work in simplifying the creation of private Clouds that look remarkably like Amazon’s EC2. You’ve probably also read RightScale’s announcements with respect to Ubuntu, and heard that Sun Microsystems were also making supportive noises about EUCALYPTUS and the EC2 API before their recent change in circumstances. Earlier today I spoke with Simon Wardley of Canonical (the commercial organisation that sells support and consultancy for Ubuntu) to hear a little more about what those downloading Ubuntu will get… and what it might mean for the rapidly shifting Cloud landscape.  Production of this podcast was supported by Talis, and show notes are available on... (more)

IBM & Cloud Computing: Getting Ready for the Zettabyte Age

Well IBM has gone and done it, they've announced a cloud offering yet again. Actually what's interesting about this go, is not that they're getting into the cloud business (again) but instead this time they're serious about it. And like it or not, they're approach actually does kind of make sense for, assuming you're within their target demographic (the large enterprise looking to save a few bucks). My summary of the "Big Blue Cloud" is as follows: It's not what you can do for the cloud, but what the cloud can do for you. Or simply, it's about the application, duh? In a statement earlier today in the New York Times, IBM CEO Sam Palmisano said, “The information technology infrastructure is under stress --- and the data flood is just accelerating.” Palmisano isn't alone in this thinking, earlier this week Cisco Systems, the mobile networking giant, released a report sug... (more)

Cloud Computing vs. Grid Computing - What's the Difference?

Thorsten von Eicken's RightScale Blog Recently Rich Wolski (UCSB Eucalyptus project) and I were discussing grid computing vs. cloud computing. An observation he made makes a lot of sense to me. Since he doesn’t blog [...], let me repeat here what he said. Grid computing has been used in environments where users make few but large allocation requests. For example, a lab may have a 1000 node cluster and users make allocations for all 1000, or 500, or 200, etc. So only a few of these allocations can be serviced at a time and others need to be scheduled for when resources are released. This results in sophisticated batch job scheduling algorithms of parallel computations. Cloud computing really is about lots of small allocation requests. The Amazon EC2 accounts are limited to 20 servers each by default and lots and lots of users allocate up to 20 servers out of the pool... (more)

Amazon’s Elastic Block Store Opens Up S3 and The Cloud

Cloud infrastructure providers like Amazon are putting out the technology that the enterprise and SaaS providers need to move beyond testing the waters and take advantage of the Cloud today. The latest, and most important from the data storage perspective, is Amazon’s Elastic Block Store, or EBS. Over the years we’ve witnessed a shift to hosted IT infrastructure where all the issues surrounding the physical plant are consolidated and managed by a specialist service. In the past six months we've witnessed the incredible rate at which cloud computing has really taken off and is now allowing businesses to shed the problems of ordering, racking and maintaining servers and disk storage systems. The public cloud is now knocking down the barriers to a broader business audience that has seen the advantages of “pay as you go” IT and not having to build or rent another data cen... (more)

RightScale Supports Open Source Cloud to Tickle Cloud Adoption

RightScale, the cloud manager, is supporting the open source Eucalyptus Public Cloud (EPC) run by the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) for purposes of cloud research and experimentation. RightScale and Eucalyptus want to tickle widespread cloud development and adoption, and figure that letting people test and evaluate their applications on the UCSB cluster will get the ball rolling. The Eucalyptus environment is designed for anything from a small student application to a massive enterprise-level cloud deployment on Amazon's EC2. RightScale and the Eucalyptus Project Team are also collaborating to deliver a more robust private cloud for organizations whose testing requirements extend beyond those offered by the EPC. Eucalyptus stands for "Elastic Utility Computing Architecture for Linking Your Programs to Useful Systems" and its current interface is EC2-... (more)

Four Ways to Profits for Data-Centered Cloud Computing Companies

John Gannon's Blog How do you make money as a datacenter-focused cloud computing company? Aside from the sale of compute capacity (a la Amazon or Rackspace), what are the other revenue opportunities available? Here are some thoughts... 1. Management tools: The cloud hosters like Amazon are providing basic management tools, but we can already see there is a proven market for higher-order management and automation provided by companies like Rightscale and 3Tera. There are also a variety of companies and products who have figured out IT automation in the traditional datacenter (Bladelogic, Opsware, etc). I’m waiting to see when they’ll start moving towards new product development (or rebranding of existing solutions) that will be focused on management of outsourced cloud environments. As their customers move to the cloud, those customers will demand that their tradition... (more)

Amazon's VPC Opens the Door for Innovation and Enterprise Cloud Adoption

Cloud Computing Journal The recent announcement from Amazon of the Virtual Private Cloud (VPC) represents the next big advance in the evolution chain for cloud computing. Enterprises can now integrate their IT infrastructure with Amazon's vast computing and storage resources, using a VPN connection from their data center to their own virtual private cloud which then looks like part of their internal network. Until the release of VPC, companies were left to build applications and utilize the cloud as a separate and somewhat siloed portion of their computing environment. In addition to the VPN connection, VPC allows cloud users to control their IP addressing within the Amazon cloud (previously IT addresses were assigned randomly). This may sound trivial, but it solves some tricky problems that made it hard to integrate cloud and internal resources. Prior to VPC, eve... (more)